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Duisport consolidates containers for the Sea Ports.

Duisport consolidates containers for the Sea Ports.

In a study, the Institute holds that the multimodal approach that has been adopted is a very good reason for locating European distribution centers in Duisport. “The presence of numerous global players of the logistics sector in Duisburg underpins that this view is correct,” confirmed Duisburger Hafen AG’s Chief Executive Officer Erich Staake. He reviewed the study at the 7th Logistics Forum Duisburg organized by BVL, the German logistics association, in the Duisburg MSV Arena on 8 and 9 March.

In the opinion of the Institute, the “remarkable potential for an improvement of sea port hinterland transportation by barge and by train” is one of the core challenges. Containers should or could further be sorted in Duisburg by the Antwerp or Rotterdam terminals to which they are to be delivered.

“The study has shown that we have become an established hinterland hub of the sea ports of Amsterdam, Rotterdam and Antwerp and are an important part of international transportation networks,” summarized Staake. The interaction between the various players such as sea port and inland port terminals, ship owners, shippers and logistic service providers requires optimization, though.

“Hub systems are complex in terms of logistics and necessitate early information flow and skilled scheduling,” said Professor Dr. Uwe Clausen who is the Fraunhofer IML director responsible for logistics, transportation and the environment. Advanced integrated information systems help to “achieve time and quality improvements in networks in which the Port of Duisburg is an important hub,” added Clausen.

Communication with existing and potential new Port customers is an essential consideration. This communication must demonstrate, as Clausen argued, that a broad range of logistic services has been developed. “A focus on new sectors and new services also strengthens the location.”

“Automobile logistics is one of the newcomers that has made rapid progress,” explained Staake. The modern roll-on roll-off facility in logport is part of the infrastructure needed for this business. E.H. Harms, the Bremen automobile logistics company, started up an intermodal 100 000 sq.m. automobile terminal with a PDI (pre-delivery inspection) center last year and Cobelfret, its Belgian competitor, also runs an automobile terminal on a neighboring tract. At the Kaßlerfeld Logistics Center, Tower Automotive, a US automobile industry supplier, built a plant which makes body structures for the Mercedes Sprinter van. Other Duisburg logistics service providers such as IHG Logistics and Kühne + Nagel also work for the automobile industry. IHG imports for instance ten million loudspeakers each year, tests them for European automobile makers at its logport site and delivers them to the manufacturing plants.

“The activities of all these organizations demonstrate that duisport has become a major vehicle and automotive component center,” underlined Staake. Over 100,000 vehicles manufactured by different car makers will be shipped through Duisburg this year.