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DP World Southampton receives capacity boost with crane rail project completion

DP World Southampton receives capacity boost with crane rail project completion
The extension is 120 m long

DP World Southampton has completed its crane rail extension, which will allow the world’s largest cranes to service the full length of the quay.

As part of the operator’s £40m (US$55m) investment this year in Britain’s second largest container terminal, the 120 m crane rail extension has foundations reaching 26 m below the ground and took 16 weeks to build.

It will facilitate the movement along the quay of some of the terminal’s 12 Liebherr cranes which stand up to 130 m high, prioritising stability.

The new configuration is designed to maximise utilisation and aims to save customers’ time by speeding up quayside loading and unloading.

The investment will give the terminal a boost together with the granting of permission for a third berth to be dredged down to a depth of more than 15 m, and the addition of a second empty container park scheduled for September.

Ernst Schulze, chief executive of DP World in the UK, said: “DP World Southampton is the most productive port in Britain – turning container trucks around faster than any of its competitors and at over 30% has the highest proportion of its containers moved by rail.

“The completion of the crane rail extension builds on the progress already made this year with the opening of a new Border Control Post and the dredging and widening work on a number of berths.”

The operator’s next project is a £3m (US$4m) investment in the redevelopment of the yard for the storage and delivery of customers’ empty containers, increasing capacity by 25%.

In March, DP World’s British terminals London Gateway and Southampton became the first deep-water ports in Britain capable of handling Freightliner’s new 775 m intermodal container trains, which are the longest in use on the national rail network and can potentially generate cost and environmental benefits.

The Dubai-based company’s two deep-water ports were also awarded freeport status by the British government earlier this year.